Review: Jordskott (S1 E2/10), Wednesday 17th June, ITV Encore

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jordskott

So Jordskott then. It’s a bit of a head-scratcher. For 57 minutes of its opening episode it proved to be an intriguing, dark and capable crime drama, using its Scandinavian roots (no pun intended) to permeate a feeling of isolation and dread throughout a small, isolated and rural Swedish community. It did this well. But then the very last scene of the episode threw the baby out with the bath water, and it turned into something very different. Something supernatural. Something odd. Something I wasn’t sure about. The previously very sick, bed-bound teenager that may or may not be the main protagonist’s long-missing daughter was found with her hand in a flower pot, eyes rolled back into her head like she was receiving some sort of ambrosian nourishment, in a reverie like a child sucking on its mother’s teat. Pulling her hands out when a nurse walked in on her, her digits were revealed to be root-like things with tendrils. Yep, it had changed tack all right. Continue reading

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Review: Hannibal (S3 E2/13), Wednesday 17th June, Sky Living

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602With the season opener making only passing reference to putative hero Will Graham (Hugh Dancy), we were left to wonder at the character’s fate after the massacre concluding season two. Hannibal may find his relationship with Graham no substitute for the sort of therapy he gets from Bedelia Du Maurier, but there’s no doubt that the two men’s fates are entangled. Hannibal, settling in Florence in the guise of Dr Fell, who he has killed, has also made away with his potential blackmailer Dimmond. Du Maurier, complicit in the killing, may be next on the menu (and what a tasty dish the juicy Gillian Anderson would make). Continue reading

Review: The Interceptor (S1 E2/8), Wednesday 17th June, BBC1

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Programme Name: The Interceptor - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. 2) - Picture Shows: (L-R) Chloe (RAYNE OBILI), Hannah (INDIA RIA AMARTEIFIO), Ralph (DAVID TROUGHTON), Ash (OT FAGBENLE), Lorna (JO JOYNER) - (C) BBC - Photographer: Des Willie

Forget our increasingly tiresome hero ‘Ash’ Ashton (O-T Fagbenle), the real star of The Interceptor, a slapstick farrago of almost every bad 1970s cop series, is Trevor Eve. We haven’t seen nearly enough of him yet. As drugs kingpin Roach, he bestrides the screen like the Colossus of Rhodes – well, the Colossus of Pringle in his canary-yellow golf vest, throwing his weight around his local golf club like a malevolent Alan Partridge. Although manically tearing up the green in a golf cart doesn’t exactly send out the same signals as careering about in a tricked-out Escalade, Trev. Still, it does put the wind up an old school tie club member at the 19th hole, so job done – we do hope you are here to stay. Continue reading

ITV announces details for Lynda La Plante’s Prime Suspect prequel, Tennison

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tennison-9781471140501_hrThere was much rubbing of hands and excitement when Lynda La Plante announced that she would be writing a new novel that would detail the young part of her most famous character, Jane Tennison. We broke the story here over a year ago, and speculated that it was only a matter of time until ITV turned it into a TV series. (Prime Suspect was one of its best-ever crime dramas and gave Helen Mirren a role that made her into a real household name.) Now, finally, we have some details about a TV adaptation and, not surprisingly, ITV is its home. In a busy day of reviews (Wednesday has become a bit of a busy bugger when it comes to crime drama), and before they all start streaming in, let’s have a look at the Tennison details… Continue reading

The Bridge creator Hans Rosenfeldt pens new crime drama for ITV

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p01qj11nWe all know how good The Bridge has been for two series (and hopefully a third when it comes back to UK screens early next year), but for the team responsible for the show the world doesn’t stop just because its mega-hit has finished filming. Oh no. This morning ITV announced that Hans Rosenfeldt has penned something new and contemporary and, wait for it, set on the streets of London. ITV went so far to call it Scandinavian Noir (I hate that phrase) in Britain (you can probably and safely speculate that this was how it was pitched to ITV). But still, mild cynicism aside, anything from Hans Rosenfeldt is worth a tickle. Details after the jump. Continue reading