REVIEW: Beck (S7 E3/4)

After last week’s underwhelming episode, in which Beck’s detective work was sidelined by various romantic relationships, will the old warhorse get the bit between his teeth now?

When a young girl finds her mother Manuela dead at the foot of the stairs, the obvious question is, did she fall, or was she pushed? Her history with an abusive ex-husband, Fredrik, suggests the latter.

He claims his violent past is behind him, and other evidence implicates her boss Bernt, his snooty wife, two online dates, a drunken new boyfriend, Ove, or a fixated friend, Rana.

Steiner is peeved at not getting the job of team leader, even more peeved at losing it to his crush Alexandra, and having trouble with his flirty wife, with whom he has a big bust-up. Beck, at this stage, is doing nothing but sitting morosely in interrogations,and noting just how badly things are going. Tensions build in Beck’s team, but Alex talks him out of intervening.

Evidence emerges of Manuela’s unstable and manipulative behaviour, but the investigation is still being pulled in two ways, Alex concentrating on the evidence of male abuse. Inevitably the two clash when Steinar questions Manuela’s daughter Maria without approval, but he does get a lead on a potentially threatening female acquaintance, Bernt’s wife Gunilla.

Attempts to break down various alibis go nowhere until Ove’s elderly mother cracks, and he admits pushing Manuela down the stairs in a drunken argument over some faked raunchy photos. but who sent them to him? Meanwhile Fredrik’s disenchanted girlfriend Katerina finds evidence on his hard drive of a campaign of online manipulation and harassment against Manuela.

Fredrik goes on the run with Maria and a shotgun, but she gets a message out and a chase ensues. In a tense confrontation, Maria is saved and Alex gets the cuffs on Fredrik.

So in the end it turns out that both Steinar and Alex were right about their suspects, and at least this gives Steinar some comfort, though his wife is still getting texts from her old flame.

Beck’s only real contribution to the action is to look peeved, and to listen to his barmy neighbour Grannen lecturing him about drinking.

So while this episode at least concentrated more on the case, serving up plenty of suspects and red herrings, and had a satisfactorily rounded examination of the relationship between Steinar and Alex, it does leave you wondering why the hell it’s still called Beck?

He contributes about as much as Taggart did after the title character died, so isn’t it about time the series was renamed Steinar? Certainly, if old Martin doesn’t pull something out of the bag in next weeks, he might as well go back into retirement, move in with Grannen and spend his twilight years sitting on the balcony drinking himself into a stupor.

Chris Jenkins

FOR OUR EPISODE ONE REVIEW CLICK HERE

FOR OUR EPISODE TWO REVIEW CLICK HERE

 

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Seija says:

    Chris, there’s only one film left, The Devil’s Advocate, in this instalment of Beck films so how much or what can Beck do to regain his former self? And how can the series/films continue in the future? There are mostly questions left…

    Like

  2. Tom says:

    Good review, thanks Chris.
    I thought this episode was much better than the previous two. The murder mystery moved at a brisk pace and was quite compelling. I enjoyed the tension between Steiner and Alex. I was really enjoying it and then, right in the middle, it inexplicably turned into a soap opera with the two scenes with Steiner and his wife arguing about ‘that kiss’ bracketing the scene with Beck and Grannen on the balcony arguing about giving up alcohol.
    Once again, I found myself checking my watch and getting fidgety with the remote control.

    Like

  3. sel539 says:

    I agree that the plot was much better this week. I can’t help thinking 4 is nowhere near enough for us to get more insight into the characters and in particular Steinar and Alex….

    Liked by 1 person

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