Sarah Phelps confirmed to adapt Agatha Christie’s The Pale Horse

Earlier this year Radio Times carried a report that Sarah Phelps would be adapting Agatha Christie’s The Pale Horse.

Now that report has been confirmed.

Christie’s 1961 novel kicks off when a mysterious list of names is found in the shoe of a dead woman, one of those named, Mark Easterbrook, begins an investigation into how and why his name came to be there.  He is drawn to The Pale Horse, the home of a trio of rumoured witches in the tiny village of Much Deeping. Word has it that the witches can do away with wealthy relatives using the dark arts alone, but as the bodies mount up, Mark is certain there has to be a rational explanation. And who could possibly want him dead?​

Phelps said: “Written in 1961, against the backdrop of the Eichmann Trial, the escalation of the Cold War and Vietnam, The Pale Horse is a shivery, paranoid story about superstition, love gone wrong, guilt and grief.  It’s about what we’re capable of when we’re desperate and what we believe when all the lights go out and we’re alone in the dark.

Meanwhile, James Prichard, Executive Producer and CEO of Agatha Christie Limited, said: The Pale Horse’ was one of the later novels penned by my great grandmother, written as it was in the 1960s. This new drama allows writer Sarah Phelps to continue her exploration of the 20th century through Christie’s stories, with the book’s fantastic, foreboding atmosphere completely suited to Sarah’s unique style of adaptation.

This will be Phelps’ fourth Agatha Christie adaptation. The two-part drama will air in 2020.

READ MORE: All our news and reviews of Agatha Christie

2 Comments Add yours

  1. Seija says:

    And the good news just keep rolling :)

    Like

  2. marblex says:

    It’s an interesting story. The television adaptation that was done was miscast, imho, despite being made up of good actors. I hope Sarah doesn’t mess the story about too much… it has a unique kick of its own and the original plot is absolutely diabolical.

    Like

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