REVIEW Shetland (S6 E4/6)

Oh Shetland, what have you done? What have you become?

This fourth episode ended with a twist… and it was a twist I saw coming. Throughout this series, as you would expect in any crime drama, suspects have been built up and processed and eliminated along the way.

One suspect – Logan Creggan – has really been zeroed in on, to the extent Shetland went all Apocolypse Now at the end of episode three when a bunch of hoodlums attacked his pasture and he shot his son Fraser as the red mist of PTSD descended upon him.

I always thought that Logan Creggan was one gigantic red herring. Why? His was an emotionally fraught story, one of war and awful experiences and coming to terms with them. There’s no way that someone so fragile, so vulnerable could be the killer of our main man Galbraith.

And yet this episode spent 60 minutes going through the wringer of that particular storyline – Jimmy and co chasing him around the islands. Armed to the max, Creggan attempted to assassinate Eve Galbraith, take down Niven Guthrie and then even young Merran Galbraith – all in the name of revenge.

When they finally did catch up with him, Jimmy found out the full truth about his awful experience of war. And, during a full PTSD meltdown, he was told that it was indeed him who had shot and killed his own son.

After the interview, Jimmy was told that the bullets found in Logan’s shed did not match those used to shoot Alex Galbraith.

And so we were back to square one. Logan Creggan was quite the detour, not just narratively, but tonally, too. Shetland changed so dramatically during the strand you almost didn’t recognise it.

So what next? Sister Cathryn made a return (she wept as she buried a necklace and key), Sandy was found to be the man leaking case photos, and Duncan is still cosying up to Donna Killick.

I hope it gets back on track in episode five because the Logan Creggan felt like the kind of detour it’s difficult to find a way back from.

Paul Hirons

Rating: 3 out of 5.

READ MORE: OUR EPISODE ONE REVIEW

READ MORE: OUR EPISODE TWO REVIEW

READ MORE: OUR EPISODE THREE REVIEW

7 Comments Add yours

  1. Coercin' A Bull says:

    I thought the story threw a light on other strands – the Guthries, the Galbraith and Gauldie murders – a few moments to arouse further suspicions with characters who’ve dropped from the radar.

    Are we sure that it’s Duncan cosying up to Donna? Not sure that’s what’s going on. (After Guilt, it’s nice not to have to be too suspicious of Mark Bonnar’s motivation…)

    Like

  2. Mr Brownlow says:

    I love the show, the main characters and the landscapes and seascapes, but it’s yet another series that has gone on too long after they ran out of storylines.

    Like

  3. Jan Hunter says:

    Thank you for your thoughts. I have been feeling somewhat disappointed with this season I am glad I am not the only one. It seems very heavy and dark I understand murder is dark but all the unhappy people and situations just makes it not as enjoyable.

    Like

  4. Shetland Watcher says:

    We don’t know it was Sandy who leaked the photos. All we know is Donny traced the computer where the photos were sent from.

    Like

  5. Elaine says:

    It felt like a one shot episode, which seemed out of kilter with what Shetland is usually about. As Coercin’ A Bull says it did throw light on a few other people, especially Fiona Bedford’s husband, who appeared a bit shifty. But I am now not sure about the Donna story. It’s hard to feel any sympathy for her and it takes time away from the main story.

    Like

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