Review : The City & The City (S1 E3/4), Friday 20th April, BBC Two

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The City & The City hit some rough terrain last week after it’s initially smooth start, as the search for Mahalia’s killer moved to Ul Qoma and… well, very little happened. With Borlú’s time running out in the sister city, can he uncover the truth about Orciny and it’s role in what happened to Mahalia – and his wife?

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Review: Ordeal By Innocence (S1 E3/3), Sunday 15th April, BBC One

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Sarah Phelps’ third Agatha Christie adaptation, Ordeal By Innocence, has been a sumptuous, delicious period treat with all those key Christie themes juggled expertly to keep us guessing. The big questions for us mere mortals were who killed Rachel Argyll and why, but for hardcore Christieites they would no doubt have had one eye on the ending – Phelps is known for changing things and giving these adaptations a different spin. Who knew what was going to happen? Continue reading

Review: Save Me (S1 E6/6), Wednesday 4th April, Sky Atlantic

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Yes, I know. It has been two weeks since the final episode of Lennie James’ British redemption noir, Save Me, and I haven’t posted my review yet. Real life got in the way, unfortunately, but today – a Sunday – I’m finally sitting down to write a review of a show that has left me breathless and befuddled in equal measure. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a series that has conflicted me so much – there was so much brilliant stuff, and yet… In fact I’m still trying to process how this series made me feel and what I thought of it. Continue reading

Review : The City & The City (S1 E2/4), Friday 13th April, BBC Two

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The City & The City returns for it’s second installment after a highly encouraging debut episode last week. David Morrissey held together the central role of Inspector Tyador Borlú well enough despite some familiar cliches (haunted past, scraggy beard, off-brand cigarettes, bit grumpy) coming along for the ride – but moreover, the character served us well as a guide for our first intrepid steps into the weird and wonderful world of these twinned cities psychologically blocked from each others’ view. With the investigation into Mahalia’s death seemingly stalled in Beszel, Borlú must make the journey to Ul Qoma to discover the truth – but finds out more than he bargained for.

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ITV recommissions fourth series of Grantchester; confirms James Norton’s exit

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Grantchester – based on the novels by James Runcie and starring James Norton and Robson Green – will return to ITV for a fourth series, it has been confirmed. The series will feature James Norton’s final episodes as character Sidney Chambers, the charismatic, jazz-loving clergyman, and one half of the unlikely crime-fighting duo based in 1950s Grantchester. Casting of the new vicar arriving in the hamlet of Grantchester will be announced shortly, ITV has said. Continue reading

BBC announces second series of Shakespeare & Hathaway – Private Investigators

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Daytime shows sort of pass us by a bit (sorry), because there’s so much to watch in primetime and on various different channels and streaming sites, but the BBC, in particular, has invested heavily in daytime drama in recent years. And what better genre to entice viewers during the afternoon than crime drama? One recent one that seems to have done well – despite its ludicrously cheesy title and premise – is Shakespeare & Hathaway – Private Investigators (yes, it’s based in Stratford Upon Avon in Warwickshire… my home county and neighbouring town!), and now the BBC has recommissioned it for a second run. Continue reading

Review: Ordeal By Innocence (S1 E2/3), Sunday 8th April, BBC One

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Last week’s opening episode of Sarah Phelps’ three-part adaptation of Ordeal By Innocence was a delicious, decadent treat for the senses: its colour palette was vibrant, both inside and out of the Argyll’s contradictorily-named Sunny Point (I’m slightly in love with Mary and Phillip Durrant’s emerald green and pink Art Deco bathroom… but this isn’t an interior design website so I’ll shut up now); the patented Agatha Christie whodunit element was as addictive as the morphine in Mary’s bathroom; and the ensemble cast was clearly putting its best foot forward and enjoying itself. Last week, the murder of matriarch, Rachel Argyll, and the subsequent death of the accused – adopted son Jack Argyll – was back in the forefront of each family member’s mind again: a man named Arthur Calgary had emerged, saying that Jack was innocent. So whodunit? Continue reading