Review: Babylon Berlin (S1 E5&6/8), Sunday 19th November, Sky Atlantic

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Apologies for the delay in posting this (been busy innit), but Babylon Berlin deserves a review – its sensuous realisations of Weimer Republic-era Berlin are one thing, but there’s an interesting story bubbling away here, too. Detective Goreon Rath has been our main focus, as has his continuing investigation into a blackmail plot involving a high-ranking mayoral candidate from his hometown of Cologne, but there are other characters that have been worth keeping an eye on – the super-ambitious Lotte Ritter, who channels the period’s carefree, have-a-go attitude; and Alexei Kardakov, a Russian counter-revolutionary, who’s leading a plot to bring Trotsky back to Russia and overthrow Lenin (good luck with that one). So there’s plenty going on, and there’s still plenty to like. Continue reading

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Review: I Know Who You Are (S1 E5&6/6), Saturday 18th November, BBC Four

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NB: SPOILERS INSIDE

Three hours. No, over three hours. That’s how long this two-part finale lasted. Anyone who has been following I Know Who You Are will know that three hours plus of this Spanish drama is likely to induce some sort of mental breakdown. These episodes – five and six of series two – contained everything we’ve loved about the show and perhaps even a little more: 100mph speed, twist and turns, red herrings galore, deliciously Machiavellian manoeuvring and some genuine shocks. Continue reading

Review: The Sinner (S1 E1-8/8), Netflix

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NB: SPOILERS INSIDE

Netflix, you’ve done it to us again. The Sinner – a series that originally appeared on the USA Network in, well, the USA – sneaked onto the streaming service last week and suddenly went a bit ballistic (as Netflix series are want to do). I got stuck into it having not really having read anything about it or knowing too much about the story. Sometimes that’s the best way to approach something – not much knowledge, low expectations – because you can just get it into. And into it I got. A lot. Continue reading

Review: Babylon Berlin (S3&4/8), Sunday 12th November, Sky Atlantic

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NB: SPOILERS INSIDE

Babylon Berlin – the expensive, and fantastic-looking, Weimer Republic-set German crime drama based on the books by Volker Kutscher – got off to a good start last week, thanks to a heady mixture of decadence, sexual blackmail, political unrest and post-war poverty. We were introduced to Kommissar Gereon Rath, a PTSD-suffering policeman sent to Berlin’s vice squad from Cologne to investigate a blackmail plot. What he landed in was significantly more dangerous and multi-layered than he even bargained for. Continue reading

Review: I Know Who You Are (S2 E3&4/6), Saturday 11th November, BBC Four

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These two episodes took us over the half-way point in this insane Spanish series, and there was very definitely a sense that the Elías-Castro family was beginning to implode. In fact, these two episodes could and should have been subtitled ‘Reap What You Sow’, because things were starting to move and get sorted out, but only in a way that manipulated us and stretched out the story in the most excruciating way possible. Which was an entirely good thing, obviously. Continue reading

Review: The Frankenstein Chronicles (S2 E2/6), Wednesday 8th November, ITV Encore

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NB: SPOILERS INSIDE

The Frankenstein Chronicles returned last week with a fairly meandering revisitation of the original series’ characters and environment. Luckily for viewers this week, the plot of the previous season was mostly left on the shelf in favour of new characters and a new mystery, as the former detective John Marlott became embroiled in a deepening conspiracy of murder as the Church and State battled for control over London. Continue reading

Review: Unspeakable (S1 E1/1), Sunday 5th November, Channel 4

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This one-off was created and written by Dave Nath, BAFTA award-winning talent behind documentary series The Murder Detectives and last year’s excellent one-off drama, The Watchman, starring Stephen Graham (see our review here). This time Nath takes us into the family home for another stand-alone story that right from the word go plunges into a world of suspicion and paranoia. Where The Watchman dealt in these themes, it also explored them very much from afar; Unspeakable plunges us right into a situation and doesn’t let us out. It was claustrophobic, incredibly tense and made me feel extremely queasy. Continue reading